Did the lecture from Asa Mittman and Sherry Lindquist draw a solid argument linking medieval othering to modern racism and xenophobia?

Word count: 750 max

Only course-assigned material should be used in responding to the prompt, unless otherwise instructed. Please cite your sources for all words, information, and ideas (videos, readings, weekly notes, etc.). Please use quotation marks when you are using someone else’s exact words. If you are paraphrasing, paraphrase completely, and cite your source. Your citation should include the author’s name and the page number, if there is one.

Directions: Please choose (and cite!) evidence from the course lectures and the readings. You should include at LEAST four (4) pieces of evidence (i.e. citations) for your response: examples from two separate lectures and two from separate readings.

Your answer must be answered at a maximum of 750 words and formatted according to standard MLA (or Chicago), 12-point font, double spaced formatting.

Prompt:

First, watch the lecture about medieval monsters:

Late medieval society evolved into what historians refer to as a “persecuting society,” thanks largely to anxieties about an ever-growing world. The created this society based on their interpretations of biblical and intellectual material, crafting the “other” out of everything that didn’t fit into the highly idealized and normative roles.

Who were these groups of people who were made into the “other,” how did that happen, and in what ways did they serve to ameliorate the social anxieties present in the late Middle Ages? Did the lecture from Asa Mittman and Sherry Lindquist draw a solid argument linking medieval othering to modern racism and xenophobia? Choose three specific subgroups of people to discuss, based on your preference from the lectures and readings.

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