What personal experiences have you had that may impact your understanding of this topic?

Reflection
After completing the reading/listening/viewing assignments for the week, please answer TWO of the following questions. The total word count for your reflection should be 150-250 words. BE SURE TO CITE TWO OF THE ASSIGNED MATERIALS (FROM THE ENTIRE COURSE) in your reflection.

What surprised you and why?
What did you disagree with and why?
To what extent is the law a useful tool to address the issue we are covering this week? Why?
How do the assignments relate to other topics covered in our class or current events?
What personal experiences have you had that may impact your understanding of this topic?
Research
Your turn! Select any state law that relates to gender with which you disagree. Look into why it was passed and how it has been implemented. Respectfully describe the cultural beliefs and personal emotions that shape the public discourse around this issue. Is there any way to determine if the law is working the way it was intended to? What lessons can we learn from better understanding this law?

The total word count for your research report should be 150-250 words.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This asynchronous, online course explores how the U.S. legal system shapes– and is shaped by– gender. Topics include sex discrimination in the workplace and educational institutions, religious freedom from/to discriminate on the basis of gender identity and sexual orientation, reproductive rights, and responsibilities, and gendered violence. Our discussions will reflect the many factors that influence how individuals view and encounter the law, including race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, political outlook, etc. Our academic focus will be on legal analysis, policy writing, and respectful dialogue about emotionally complex topics.

COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
Demonstrate a working knowledge of the key legislation and judicial rulings that shape gender policy in this country

Explain the many factors that influence how individuals view and encounter the law, such as race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender identity, religion
and political outlook.

Respectfully articulate the cultural beliefs and personal emotions that shape the public discourse about gender and sex

Craft a compelling argument about gender policy using logic and evidence

OVERVIEW OF ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING

I want you all to succeed. There is no curve and no reason you cannot all learn deeply, demonstrate this, and receive an excellent grade. Here are some ways I support your success:
I provide detailed grading rubrics so you will know how grades are determined.
I offer you a chance to get feedback prior to final grading when possible.
I grade from 50-100% so one “zero” cannot ruin a semester of effort.
I offer a step-by-step guide for the policy memo assignment that includes a “pre-memo” graded for completion.
I have an online sign-up system to make it easy to sign up for office hours, and I keep adding hours until everyone who wants to meet with me can do so.
PLEASE NOTE: You will need to take advantage of the support I am offering at the time I am offering it. If you wait till the end of the semester I will not have time to help you succeed.
There are four parts of your grade.

INTRODUCTION ASSIGNMENT (5%)
During the first week of the course, each student will 1) post an introduction about themselves using jamboard, 2) interview a classmate, and 3) complete a learning goals survey.
Look for “Introduction Assignment” (under “Assignments”). You will find a link there to a jamboard, which is an electronic bulletin board. If you scroll you will see each student has their own jamboard. I ask that you fill this with sticky notes, images, links to music– whatever you feel will help us get to know you better. At a minimum, please include
Your name, your pronouns (such as she/her or they/them)
Your rear in school and academic interests/major/minor
Where you are (geographically) this summer, and why
Something you were confused (or curious) about gender when you were a child
Something about gender and the law you wish you knew more about
And of course I encourage you to go back later in the week to get to know your classmates!

Look for the Introduction Google Doc (under “Collaborations”). You will find your name matched with one or two other classmates. You will need to find a time you can meet synchronously, either via zoom or phone, to chat for about 15 minutes. (You can email each other through Canvas by going to “People.”)

When you meet, please introduce yourselves and find two things you DO have in common and two things you DO NOT have in common. It could be a passion for pizza, an academic interest, a love or loathing for tic tok, a first language– really, anything at all. Then note what you learned in that Introduction Document.

Complete the Learning Goals Survey in the Orientation Module. This is a very short survey that will only be shared with me.

ALL three Introduction exercises are due Wed, June 8, 2022 at 11:59pm
HOW WILL THIS BE GRADED?
100% – completed thoroughly and promptly
70% – completed, but work was not thorough and/or not timely
50% – not submitted in time to contribute to class and/or quality of work unacceptable

REFLECTIONS (25%) and ONLINE DISCUSSION (10%)
During Weeks 2-7, students will complete the assignments and accompanying instructor videos, then submit reflections to a Discussion Board. Be sure to follow the prompt for each week; some will require additional research.
These reflections are due Wednesday evening (by 11:59 pm). On Thursdays and Fridays, students will return to the Discussion Board to review and respond to at least two of their classmates’ reflections.
HOW WILL THIS BE GRADED?
There are a total of six discussions (which involves submitting a reflection, reading your classmates’ reflections, and then discussing together). 25% of your grade will reflect the quality of your reflections, and 10% of your grade will reflect the extent to which you meaningfully engage in the online discussion with your classmates. For each of these assignments, I will use three marks:
100%- completed promptly, demonstrates specific knowledge of assignment materials
70% – completed but work was not thorough and/or not timely
50% – not submitted in time to contribute to class and/or quality of work unacceptable
I know that “forced” online conversations can be a bit awkward, especially when you are being graded, so I want to be clear that I am grading on basic content (yep, you actually did the reading and had something to say), tone (respectful, interested), and authenticity (bring yourself to the conversation, your unique perspective and ideas).

STUDENT-FACILITATED LESSONS (25%)

Once during the course, each student will create an online lesson for the class and then co-lead an online discussion. Sign-ups for this activity will occur at the beginning of the course. You may select an article relating to sex discrimination at school (Module Two), sex discrimination at work (Module Three), or bodily autonomy (Module Four).

Students will select one peer-review journal article that is less than five years old. Some pieces will be provided but you are welcome to choose your own. Additional materials may be used to understand the topic better. The goal will be to give a 7-9 minute lesson using compelling audio and straightforward, visually compelling visuals to explain to your classmates what this journal article said and why it matters, as well as to offer your critique of its thesis. After you submit your lesson, you will lead an online discussion by fielding your classmates’ questions and sharing/encouraging related discussions.

Your online lesson will count as 20% of your final grade, and your leadership in the class discussion of your lesson will count as 5% of your grade. You will not be graded on your participation in class discussions of your classmates’ lessons, but please be a good colleague and help their online discussion succeed.
The student lesson assignment will be graded using a rubric provided. Students are welcome to submit the lesson to me for ungraded feedback ONE WEEK before the due date (via email). But note that my feedback will probably require you re-recording and updating your lesson visuals. I will not have time to provide feedback after that time (so please don’t ask).
POLICY MEMO (35% of your final grade)
Early in the course, each student will identify a current legal or public policy problem related to gender. Students will conduct research, develop evidence-based recommendations, and then craft a 1600-1800 word memo that uses logic and data to propose a legal or policy change. A grading rubric will be provided.
To help you complete this assignment I have provided a policy memo worksheet, which I strongly recommend completing, but will not be graded. There are deadlines built into the worksheet to help you stay on track. You will need to begin this project the second week of the course in order to stay on track.

The final memo grade includes submitting a draft and a conducting peer review of a classmate’s memo, so you will have what you need to complete an excellent memo. Your grade for this assignment consists of three grades: 5% for the quality of your draft memo, 5% for the quality of your peer review, and 25% for your final memo.

I will translate percentages to letter grades in this way:

95 – 100 % = A
90 – 94 % = A-
87 – 89 % = B+
83 – 86 % = B
80 – 82 % = B-
77 – 79 % = C+
73 – 76 % = C
70 – 72 % = C
67 – 69 % = D+
60 – 66 % = D

Below 60 % = F

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course begins with an Orientation and has five modules. The first module is one week long and will set the stage for the rest of the course. Modules Two, Three, and Four are all two weeks. During these modules, you will be in regular communication with both me and each other. Although there are no “group projects” requiring students to coordinate schedules, there will be assignments that require you to submit an assignment for other students to review. This means that missing an assignment deadline would greatly inconvenience your classmates. Because the public policy memo assignment culminates in the final Module, I have put the related materials and assignments there (you will have access to that material through the course). During this final module (the final week of the course)I will offer some unifying themes and help you wrap your last assignment, a public policy/ legal memo.
This course has no timed quizzes and no final exam.

Brave Space
We will discuss many emotionally loaded topics and, given the prevalence of gender and sexual harm in our society, it is likely that at least a few (or many) of you will have experienced related trauma. If certain conversations or readings are not a useful learning tool for you, please let me know and we can find an alternative approach. I encourage you to listen to your feelings carefully; we often repress memories of sexual harm, so distress can sometimes come on suddenly.

I expect common sense good manners in my classroom. I also want my classroom to be an intellectually exciting community, a place where we can speak authentically, ask “dumb” questions, and admit biases and fears. The nature of these conversations means that some of these questions and discussions may be embarrassing, upsetting, or otherwise difficult. Given the importance of these conversations, I do not offer my classroom as a space safe from such discomfort, but rather as a brave space, where authenticity is rewarded with kindness.
AlI viewpoints, courteously expressed, are respectfully and enthusiastically welcomed. Please know that you do NOT have to share any political or social beliefs with me or anyone else in the class in order to succeed in my class. And remember there are no prerequisites; I sincerely welcome students who have no experience in women’s and gender studies.
ORIENTATION
The orientation provides an overview of the course and introduces you to your instructor and peers. You will also learn about the technical requirements and where to get support. Please note there are graded assignments in the Orientation Module- please do not skip over it.

The Basics
What to Expect
Getting to Know Each Other
MODULE 1: Setting the Stage
Law, Public Policy, Gender
The Problem of the Binary
Reconstruction and Civil Rights
What happened to the ERA?
MODULE 2: Sex Discrimination in Education
The Promise and Problems of Title IX
Sexual Citizenship and Harassment on Campus
Sexual Harm and Due Process- for Whom?
Bathrooms, Sports and Gender Identity
MODULE 3: Sex Discrimination at Work
What does Title VII of the Civil Rights Act do?
What counts as harassment and who decides?
What does “because of sex” even mean?
Is there religious freedom to discriminate on the basis of sex?
MODULE 4: Sex Discrimination at Home
Bodily Autonomy and Reproduction
Gendered Violence
Gender, Sex and Marriage
MODULE 5: Bringing it All Together
Policy Memo Support
Course Review
Course Evaluation

DETAILED ASSIGNMENTS WITH DEADLINES

To help plan your schedule, here are all the assignments and deadlines mapped out by day.

ORIENTATION
The purpose of orientation is to ensure that you understand how the class will work and get to know each other.
By Wednesday, June 8
Review Orientation Module
Watch Instructor Welcome and Orientation Videos
Complete the four-part introduction assignment
Create your personalized Jamboard page
Interview the Classmate assigned to you (under Collaborations)
Complete Survey on Learning Style and Goals
Sign up for Student-Lesson (under Collaborations)
MODULE 1: Setting the Stage
Module 1 sets the stage for the rest of the course. We start with an overview of the United States legal system and then discuss the fundamental challenge of defining gender. We then focus on the Reconstruction era to understand how the social concepts of race and sex are inextricably linked. We conclude this module by exploring the failure of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).
Module Level Learning Goals
Explore how perceptions of the sex/gender binary shape the national conversation about sex discrimination
Compare the cultural influences that led to the failure of the ERA with the current cultural and political gender landscape.
This Module has four parts.
Law, Public Policy and Gender
The Problem of the Binary
Race, Civil Rights, and Reconstruction
Whatever happened to the ERA?
By Wednesday, June 8
Complete Module 1 Law, Public Policy and Gender
U.S. Constitutional Amendments: 1st, 5th, 13th, and 14th, 15th, 19th
Bradwell v. State of Illinois, 83 U.S. 130 (1873)
Eric Foner on the 14th Amendment (National Constitution Center)
Watch Instructor Videos Module 1: Law, Public Policy and Gender (in two parts)
Complete Orientation Assignments
By Friday, June 11
Complete Module 1 The Problem of the Binary
Why Sex is Not Binary, Fausto-Sterling, Anne, New York Times, 26 Oct 2018.
An Introduction to Transgendered People (from TransEquality)
Pew Research Study on Attitudes Toward Transgender People (Summary)
Anderson, Transgender Ideology Is Riddled With Contradictions, 2/9/18 (Please note: this anti-trans article uses homophobic and transphobic language).
Clarke, Jessica, They. Them and Theirs, Harvard Law Review, JAN 10, 2019, 132 Harv. L. Rev. 894 p. 896-904. OR Jessica Clarke: They, Them & Theirs, Including Nonbinary Gender Identities in Law and Policy Podcast – first 18 minutes
Watch Instructor Videos Module 1: The Problem of the Binary (two parts)
Complete Module 1 Race, Civil Rights, and Reconstruction
First Chapter Women and Law (1).pdf
August 21, 2017, Constitutional Podcast “Race” here minute 16:30-41
Watch Instructor Video Module 1: Race, Civil Rights, and Reconstruction
Complete Whatever happened to the ERA? Assignments
Ruth Bader Ginsberg argues Frontiero v. Richardson (you may want to listen to the entire argument but if at least listen to Ginsberg, who begins at about 16:30). The original recording can be found on Oyez.org.
Handbill, “Equal Rights Amendment.” (1920). U.S. Capitol Visitor Center.
Doing the Impossible: Defeating the ERA – P. Schlafly, Jun 23, 2017 (till min 13)
Listen to at least ONE of the following podcasts:
Sex Appeal
More Perfect. (2017). WNYC Studios. August 28, 2017, Constitutional Podcast “Gender”
Stuff You Missed in History Class (Almost) 100 Years of the Equal Rights Amendment Feb 10, 2020,
Watch Instructor Video Module 1: Whatever happened to the ERA?
Review Module 5 (Nothing to submit)
Read Policy Memo Assignment and Rubric

Module Two: Sex Discrimination at School

Module 2 will focus on Title IX of the education amendments of 1972, usually referred to as “Title Nine.”
Module Level Learning Goals
Explain sex discrimination laws in education, including progressive and conservative perspectives on implementation
Analyze key Supreme Court cases related to sex and gender in education
Identify the common fears, perceptions, and misperceptions about sexual harassment and assault
This Module has four parts:
The Promise and Problems of Title IX
Sexual Citizenship and Harassment on Campus
Sexual Harm and Due Process- for Whom?
Bathrooms, Sports and Gender Identity
We will also begin two additional online discussions: Student-Facilitated Lessons and Small Group Discussions. There is no way to make up for not participating in an asynchronous online discussion once the deadline passes, so please plan accordingly.
By Wednesday June 15
Complete Module 2 The Promise and Problems of Title IX
Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, 20 U.S.C. §1681
Title IX Regulations, 34 C.F.R. JUST Subparts C, D, and E
Title IX 45-Opportunity through Equity in Education JUST pages 1-9
Bartlett, K. T. Chapter 4: Unconstitutionally Male?: The Story of United States v. Virginia (2010). In Schneider, E. M., & Wildman, S. M. (Eds1). Women and the law stories. New York: Foundation Press/Thomson Reuters.
Single-Gender Public Schools in 5 Charts—Education Week.
Watch Instructor Video Module 2: The Promise and Problems of Title IX
Submit #1 Reflection then on Thursday or Friday please read classmates’ reflections and discuss

By Friday, June 17
Complete Module 2 Sexual Citizenship and Harassment on Campus
Watch these three short videos
Sexual Projects
Sexual Citizenship
Sexual Geographies
Read Georgetown 2019 Climate Survey Results. (n.d.). Sexual Misconduct
Read Anonymous. (2019). VIEWPOINT: “Perpetrators Are Being Found Innocent”: How Georgetown Continues to Fail Survivors
Watch Instructor Video Module 2 Harassment and Assault in Educational Settings
Contribute before #1 Discussion Closes
Complete Policy Memo Worksheet Step One (No Submission Required)

By Wednesday, June 22

Complete Module 2 Sexual Harm and Due Process- for Whom?
Title IX: U.S. Department of Education Title IX Final Rule Overview PDF (553K)
Due Process Is Needed For Sexual Harassment Accusations — But For Whom?
JSTOR Daily Sexual-Paranoia-Strikes-Academe.pdf
Title IX, Religious Exemptions & Campus Climate: LGTB Protections In Higher Education
Watch Instructor Video Module 2 Due Process- for Whom? Susan Kruth, FIRE
Group A posts lessons; all other students watch and then participate in discussion
Submit #2 Reflection then read classmates’ reflections and discuss

By Friday, June 24
Complete Module 2 Bathrooms, Sports and Gender Identity Assignments
Department of Education Office of Civil Rights Title IX and Athletics (just read this one page, you don’t need to. understand all the nuances)
Reynolds A, Hamidian Jahromi A. Transgender Athletes in Sports Competitions: How Policy Measures Can Be More Inclusive and Fairer to All. Front Sports Act Living. 2021;3:704178. Published 2021 Jul 14. doi:10.3389/fspor.2021.704178 Trans Athletes Policy Measures.pdf
Sheer, Josselyn. “A Legal Analysis: The Transgender Bathroom Debate.” Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, vol. 47, no. 1, March 2020, p. 53-72. HeinOnline. (pages 54-60) 47JSocSocWelfare53.pdf
Watch Instructor Video Module 2 Sports, Bathrooms & Gender Identity at School
Contribute before Group A Student-Facilitated Discussion Closes
Contribute before #2 Discussion Closes
Check in with the classmate you interviewed

Unit Three: Sex Discrimination at Work

We will spend two weeks studying Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which regulates behavior in employment settings. During this module, we will learn why this law was enacted and why it matters, how it works for a range of gender-related issues and both conservative and progressive perspectives on how best to implement the law.

Module Level Learning Goals

Explain sex discrimination laws in employment, including progressive and conservative perspectives on implementation
Analyze how religion, and specifically the concept of religious freedom, impacts employment discrimination laws
Explore how cultural beliefs about pregnancy and parenting shape public policy

This Module has four parts:
What does Title VII of the Civil Rights Act do?
Sexual harassment at work: What counts and who decides?
What does “because of sex” even mean?
Is there religious freedom to discriminate?
By Wednesday, June 29
Complete Module 3 What does Title VII of the Civil Rights Act do? Assignments
Sex-Based Discrimination | U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [Official government site]. US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Just this page.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Law (SKIM)
Chamallas, M. Chapter 9: Of Glass Ceilings, Sex Stereotypes, and Mixed Motives: Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins. (2010). In Schneider, E. M., & Wildman, S. M. (Eds1). Women and law stories. New York: Foundation Press/Thomson Reuters. Pricewaterhouse chapter.pdf
Gender Socialization is Real (Complex) Devon Price, Nov 5, 2018, · 10 min read
Griffin, Chanté, How Natural Black Hair at Work Became a Civil Rights Issue July 3, 2019
Watch Instructor Video Module 3 What does Title VII of the Civil Rights Act do? (four parts)
Group B posts lessons; all other students watch and then participate in discussion
Submit #3 Reflection then read classmates’ reflections and discuss
By Friday, July 1
Complete Module 3 Sexual harassment at work: What counts?
“The Conversation: Prof Anita Hill and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford” Because of Anita” Podcast (Pineapple Street Studios & The Meteor)
EEOC Policy Guidance on Current Issues of Sexual Harassment Just Background Section
How the #MeTooPoliSci Collective is making a difference in political science (Nadia Brown)
Donegan, M. (2018, January 10 Istartedthelist.pdf The Cut.
Watch Instructor Video Module 3: What counts as sexual harassment?
Watch Interview with Executive Director Maryland Women’s Legislative Caucus
Contribute before Group B Student-Facilitated Discussion Closes
Contribute before #3 Discussion Closes
Complete Policy Memo Worksheet Step Two (No submission)
By Wednesday July 6
Complete Module 3 What does “because of sex” even mean?
One-hour arguments in Altitude Express v. Zarda/Bostock v. Clayton County and R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Symposium: LGBT rights and religious freedom—finding a better way **Homophobic Language Used
Instructor Video Module 3: What does “because of sex” even mean?
Submit #4 Reflection then read classmates’ reflections and discuss
By Friday, July 8
Complete Module 3 Is there religious freedom to discriminate?
Summary of Fulton v Philadelphia
Conscience in Commerce Article- Just Introduction
Symposium: LGBT rights and religious freedom—finding a better way
**Note: Homophobic Language Used
Instructor Video Module 3: A religious freedom to discriminate?
Contribute before #4 Discussion Closes

Unit Four: Sex Discrimination and Bodily Autonomy

We will spend the next two weeks exploring “all the other” places in your life where the law regulates (prohibits, enables, requires, etc) your life in gendered ways. We will learn how and why sex, pregnancy, and procreation are regulated by the state, how and why violence against women at home has been treated differently by law enforcement than other kinds of violence, how same-sex marriage became the “law of the land” and conservative and progressive perspectives on how/whether to regulate these personal aspects of our lives.
Module Level Learning Goals
Explain sex discrimination laws related to bodily autonomy, including progressive/conservative perspectives on implementation
Analyze key Supreme Court cases related to sex, gender, and bodily autonomy
Apply the concepts of racialized gender, intersectionality, identity politics, and marginalization to gender and the law
This Module has three parts:
Reproductive Rights, Responsibilities and Justice
Gendered Violence
Gender and Marriage

By Wednesday, July 13
Complete Module 4 Reproductive Rights, Responsibilities and Justice
Leaked Supreme Court Draft of Mississippi v Jackson Women’s Health. You only need to review the highlighted sections
Ikemoto, L.C. Chapter 5: Infertile by Force and Federal Complicity: The Story of Relf v. Weinberger. (2010). In Schneider, E. M., & Wildman, S. M. (Eds1). Women and law stories. New York: Foundation Press/Thomson Reuters.
33, Married, & Ready For A Baby: I Am The Face Of Late-Term Abortion By Brandi Eaton, 2017· 9 min read
Family Research Council: The Best Pro-Life Arguments for Secular Audiences By Cathy Ruse and Rob Schwarz (SKIM)
Watch Instructor Video Module 4 Reproductive Rights, Responsibilities and Justice
Submit #5 Reflection then read classmates’ reflections and discuss
Group C posts lessons; all other students watch and then participate in discussion

By Friday, July 15

Complete Module 4 Gendered Violence
Fenton, Z. Chapter 11: State-Enabled Violence: The Story of Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales. (2010). In Schneider, E. M., & Wildman, S. M. (Eds1). Women and law stories. New York: Foundation Press/Thomson Reuters.
The National Domestic Violence Hotline
(Please review at least the first page of statistics)
Domestic Violence & Human Rights: Lenahan v. USA Oct 24, 2011 Note- this may be very upsetting to watch)
SayHerNameReportJuly2015.pdf (at least Background/Purpose Section)
Violence against women—it’s a men’s issue: Jackson Katz at TEDxFiDiWomen,
Watch Instructor Video Module 4 Gendered Violence
Contribute before Group C Student-Facilitated Discussion Closes
Contribute before #5 Discussion Closes
Complete Policy Memo Worksheet Step Three (No submission)

By Wednesday, July 20

Complete Module 4 Gender and Marriage
Obergefell v. Hodges. (2016.). Oyez. (Parts 1-2)
Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. CO Civil Rights Commission. (2017-2018). Oyez
The Federalist Society’s Summary of Masterpiece case
Watch Instructor Video Module 4 Gender and Marriage
Submit #6 Reflection then read classmates’ reflections and discuss
By Friday, July 22
Contribute before #6 Discussion Closes
STEP FOUR: Submit Memo in the Google Doc Provided

OPTIONAL BUT INTERESTING: Family Research Council: The Best Pro-Life Arguments for Secular Audiences By Cathy Ruse and Rob Schwarzwalder

Module Five: Bringing it All Together

We will spend the last weeks of the course applying what we have learned about gender, law, and public policy to draft, review, and finalize a policy memo. We will also review course materials from Modules 1-4.
Module Level Learning Goals
Extrapolate findings from peer-reviewed legal journal articles
Use social science research to bolster a public policy argument
Effectively present and address counter-arguments
By Monday, July 25
Begin Reviewing Two Classmates’ Memos
By Tuesday, July 26
Complete Reviewing Two Classmates’ Memos
Watch Instructor Video Module 5: Review
By Friday, July 29
Submit Final Memo
Course Review – TBD
Complete Class Evaluation

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